DAILY BEAST TUMBLRS

4:53 PM, March 8th, 2013
nprfreshair:

For your weekend reading, Larissa MacFarquhar’s New Yorker profile of programmer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz, “Requiem for a Dream.” Much has been written about Swartz in the wake of his January suicide and you might well — and understandably so — be Swartz-ed out. That said, this piece illustrates him not as martyr figure or genius figure or any other kind of figure, but as a complicated, brilliant and difficult human being. MacFarquhar uses block quotes from the people closest to him and juxtaposes the quotes against one another to illuminating effect. This paragraph in particular struck me. It articulates so well the nature of writing online and what effect that can have on readers. I’ve been thinking about it all week:

Prose creates a strong illusion of presence—so strong that it is difficult to destroy it. It is hard to remember that you are reading and not hearing. The illusion is stronger when the prose is online, partly because you are aware that it might be altered or redacted at any moment—the writer may be online, too, as you read it—and partly because the Internet has been around for such a short time that we implicitly assume (as we do not with a book) that the writer of a blog post is alive.

-Nell
Image of Aaron Swartz via John-Brown/Flickr

This is an amazing read. A view into an incredibly interesting person. 

nprfreshair:

For your weekend reading, Larissa MacFarquhar’s New Yorker profile of programmer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz, “Requiem for a Dream.” Much has been written about Swartz in the wake of his January suicide and you might well — and understandably so — be Swartz-ed out. That said, this piece illustrates him not as martyr figure or genius figure or any other kind of figure, but as a complicated, brilliant and difficult human being. MacFarquhar uses block quotes from the people closest to him and juxtaposes the quotes against one another to illuminating effect. This paragraph in particular struck me. It articulates so well the nature of writing online and what effect that can have on readers. I’ve been thinking about it all week:

Prose creates a strong illusion of presence—so strong that it is difficult to destroy it. It is hard to remember that you are reading and not hearing. The illusion is stronger when the prose is online, partly because you are aware that it might be altered or redacted at any moment—the writer may be online, too, as you read it—and partly because the Internet has been around for such a short time that we implicitly assume (as we do not with a book) that the writer of a blog post is alive.


-Nell

Image of Aaron Swartz via John-Brown/Flickr

This is an amazing read. A view into an incredibly interesting person. 

Reblogged from NPR Fresh Air
11:05 AM, January 15th, 2013
The prosecution is said to have insisted on prison time, keeping the tone Ortiz personally set when Swartz was indicted last year. Her guiding sense in these matters seems to be the right and wrong of her parents, monumentally honest souls who came to New York from Puerto Rico with little English or education, but who were able to send her on to a better life made with hard work and loving attention, the father laboring in the garment district and driving a cab and selling trinkets on the street, sometimes with Ortiz at his side, finally saving enough to open a variety store, every dollar hard-earned.
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