DAILY BEAST TUMBLRS

5:07 PM, March 11th, 2011
For this week’s installment of “This Week In Cheats,” we wanted to focus on our second annual Women in the World summit—with luminaries and dignitaries from around the globe joining together here in New York City to discuss solutions and, as our Editor-In-Chief writes, “awaken new commitments to change the lives of women of the world.” 
We’ve heard four brave women from Middle Eastern countries talk about their new forms of protest in a panel called “Firebrands: Pioneers in the New Age of Digital Dissent,” moderated by Christiane Amanpour.
Melinda Gates announce the Gates Foundation was investing $1.5 billion towards mothers and newborns, a heart-breaking story about acid attacks on a child, journalists on the frontlines, a session on human sex trafficking in the U.S., and of course, a conversation with President Bill Clinton. 
Friday’s third session started with actress Ashley Judd delivering a powerful, if upsetting message about the child sex trade. “Who are these men who buy children for sex?” she asked the audience. “They are our fathers, our uncles. The guy who gets out of the taxi before you get in, the guy on the stair-master next to you.”
Tonight, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton joins us for what’s sure to be a lively discussion. You can watch her talk livestreamed online later tonight.
As battles between forces loyal to Libyan dictator Moammar Gaddafi and rebels saw the uprisings take a turn toward civil war. In the U.S., the debate continues in the U.S. as to whether we should commit to enforcing a no-fly zone over the African country, which would ground fighter jets and helicopters ferrying mercenaries. For his part, President Bill Clinton told Tina Brown on stage at our Women in the World summit that he would support such a no-fly zone. “We have the planes to make an appropriate contribution to this,” the former president said. “I wouldn’t do it if [the rebels] hadn’t asked. We should do it.”
Oh! And, in case you missed it, we announced the 150 Women who Shake the World list with a fantastic interactive on the site. Go click around & find a new hero.

For this week’s installment of “This Week In Cheats,” we wanted to focus on our second annual Women in the World summit—with luminaries and dignitaries from around the globe joining together here in New York City to discuss solutions and, as our Editor-In-Chief writes, “awaken new commitments to change the lives of women of the world.” 

  • We’ve heard four brave women from Middle Eastern countries talk about their new forms of protest in a panel called “Firebrands: Pioneers in the New Age of Digital Dissent,” moderated by Christiane Amanpour.
  • Melinda Gates announce the Gates Foundation was investing $1.5 billion towards mothers and newborns, a heart-breaking story about acid attacks on a child, journalists on the frontlines, a session on human sex trafficking in the U.S., and of course, a conversation with President Bill Clinton. 
  • Friday’s third session started with actress Ashley Judd delivering a powerful, if upsetting message about the child sex trade. “Who are these men who buy children for sex?” she asked the audience. “They are our fathers, our uncles. The guy who gets out of the taxi before you get in, the guy on the stair-master next to you.”
  • Tonight, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton joins us for what’s sure to be a lively discussion. You can watch her talk livestreamed online later tonight.
  • As battles between forces loyal to Libyan dictator Moammar Gaddafi and rebels saw the uprisings take a turn toward civil war. In the U.S., the debate continues in the U.S. as to whether we should commit to enforcing a no-fly zone over the African country, which would ground fighter jets and helicopters ferrying mercenaries. For his part, President Bill Clinton told Tina Brown on stage at our Women in the World summit that he would support such a no-fly zone. “We have the planes to make an appropriate contribution to this,” the former president said. “I wouldn’t do it if [the rebels] hadn’t asked. We should do it.”
  • Oh! And, in case you missed it, we announced the 150 Women who Shake the World list with a fantastic interactive on the site. Go click around & find a new hero.
3:16 PM, March 4th, 2011
Turmoil continues in Libya, people won’t—or can’t—stop talking about Charlie Sheen, and some interesting happenings in the world of sex education. Take a look back at what happened this week.
Violence continued in Libya, as the country teetered on the brink of civil war. Rebels have stated that they won’t negotiate with Gaddafi, and have urged for foreign intervention. The international community debated sending warships and conducting air strikes to speed Gaddafi’s downfall, but Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has said that the U.S. isn’t ready to commit military action. President Obama did, however, make his most forceful statement yet this week, saying “let me just be very unambiguous about this. Colonel Qaddafi needs to step down from power and leave.” Additional pressure came from the UN, which suspended Libya from the UN Human Rights Council, and the Hague announced it would open an investigation into crimes against humanity committed by Gaddafi and his regime. More than 1,000 Libyans have reportedly been killed so far.
How much do we love to spin the Charlie Sheen story? Let us count the ways: a casting couch for his replacement on Two and a Half Men, moments from that "winningest" interview, the poetry of Charlie Sheen, Charlie Sheen quotes paired with New Yorker cartoons, and (my personal favorite) cats quoting Charlie Sheen. 
Speaking of high-profile meltdowns, Christian Dior designer John Galliano also caused an uproar when a video of his drunken, anti-Semetic rants surfaced after his anti-Semetic remarks last week at a bar in Paris. He’s since been fired from Dior, and reportedly Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell are urging him to check into rehab.
It was also quite an interesting week in sex ed. A study from the medical journal Lancet found that half of men may be infected with human papillomavirus, or HPV. The virus can lead to cervical cancer in women, who have been recommended to be vaccinated against it. U.S. vaccine advisers are now debating whether to roll out similar recommendations for men. Then there was a CDC survey that found that teen virginity is on the rise, not something you hear every day. And, finally, that Northwestern sex demonstration. We’ll let you read here for more about that.

Turmoil continues in Libya, people won’t—or can’t—stop talking about Charlie Sheen, and some interesting happenings in the world of sex education. Take a look back at what happened this week.

  • Violence continued in Libya, as the country teetered on the brink of civil war. Rebels have stated that they won’t negotiate with Gaddafi, and have urged for foreign intervention. The international community debated sending warships and conducting air strikes to speed Gaddafi’s downfall, but Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has said that the U.S. isn’t ready to commit military action. President Obama did, however, make his most forceful statement yet this week, saying “let me just be very unambiguous about this. Colonel Qaddafi needs to step down from power and leave.” Additional pressure came from the UN, which suspended Libya from the UN Human Rights Council, and the Hague announced it would open an investigation into crimes against humanity committed by Gaddafi and his regime. More than 1,000 Libyans have reportedly been killed so far.
  • How much do we love to spin the Charlie Sheen story? Let us count the ways: a casting couch for his replacement on Two and a Half Men, moments from that "winningest" interview, the poetry of Charlie Sheen, Charlie Sheen quotes paired with New Yorker cartoons, and (my personal favorite) cats quoting Charlie Sheen. 
  • Speaking of high-profile meltdowns, Christian Dior designer John Galliano also caused an uproar when a video of his drunken, anti-Semetic rants surfaced after his anti-Semetic remarks last week at a bar in Paris. He’s since been fired from Dior, and reportedly Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell are urging him to check into rehab.
  • It was also quite an interesting week in sex ed. A study from the medical journal Lancet found that half of men may be infected with human papillomavirus, or HPV. The virus can lead to cervical cancer in women, who have been recommended to be vaccinated against it. U.S. vaccine advisers are now debating whether to roll out similar recommendations for men. Then there was a CDC survey that found that teen virginity is on the rise, not something you hear every day. And, finally, that Northwestern sex demonstration. We’ll let you read here for more about that.
3:39 PM, February 25th, 2011
A lot of civil unrest, a bright spot for gay marriage, and a celebrity meltdown. Read below for a recap of this week’s highlights.
Moving east to west, anti-Gaddafi protestors overtook Libyan cities throughout the week. Despite the domino-like effect, Libyan leader Muanmmar Gaddafi has refused to cede power. After national troops abandoned Gaddafi, he brought in mercenaries and irregular forces to carry out brutal attacks on protestors to suppress the uprising. The eccentric and despotic ruler even went so far as to claim that al Qaeda was behind the protests and that they were supplying protestors with "hallucinogenic pills in their coffee." Though Gaddafi has lost control of most of the country, on Friday his oldest son said in an interview, “Plan A is to live and die in Libya, Plan B is to live and die in Libya, Plan C is to live and die in Libya.”
Stateside, Wisconsin was a hotbed for protesters who oppose Republican Governor Scott Walker’s bill to limit public-sector unions’ collective-bargaining powers. They’ve been crowding the state’s Capital building all week. In the early morning hours on Friday, Republicans in Wisconsin’s State Assembly maneuvered a tricky and quick electronic vote to pass Walker’s bill—so quick that many Democrats didn’t get their “no” votes in. Now it’s up to the State Senate. Last week, all 14 Senate Democrats fled the state to prevent a vote; that, along with Ohio and Indiana, will be the next frontier for the issue.
Gay marriage had a big win this week when President Obama deemed the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional. He has instructed the Department of Justice to stop fighting challenges to the law in court.
Charlie Sheen’s latest public meltdown may be a turning point in his ongoing downward spiral. After Sheen called into a radio show and ranted against the producer of his show, Two and a Half Men, (calling him a “clown” and “little maggot”) CBS decided they had no choice but to pull the plug, at least temporarily. But who knows if that will stop Sheen. He told ABC’s Good Morning America that he’ll continue showing up for work, and is also saying that he’s 100 percent clean. Sheen’s fans may need not worry about screen time with the actor; Radar Online is reporting that he’s in talks with HBO to star in his own show, Sheen’s Corner.

A lot of civil unrest, a bright spot for gay marriage, and a celebrity meltdown. Read below for a recap of this week’s highlights.

  • Moving east to west, anti-Gaddafi protestors overtook Libyan cities throughout the week. Despite the domino-like effect, Libyan leader Muanmmar Gaddafi has refused to cede power. After national troops abandoned Gaddafi, he brought in mercenaries and irregular forces to carry out brutal attacks on protestors to suppress the uprising. The eccentric and despotic ruler even went so far as to claim that al Qaeda was behind the protests and that they were supplying protestors with "hallucinogenic pills in their coffee." Though Gaddafi has lost control of most of the country, on Friday his oldest son said in an interview, “Plan A is to live and die in Libya, Plan B is to live and die in Libya, Plan C is to live and die in Libya.”
  • Stateside, Wisconsin was a hotbed for protesters who oppose Republican Governor Scott Walker’s bill to limit public-sector unions’ collective-bargaining powers. They’ve been crowding the state’s Capital building all week. In the early morning hours on Friday, Republicans in Wisconsin’s State Assembly maneuvered a tricky and quick electronic vote to pass Walker’s bill—so quick that many Democrats didn’t get their “no” votes in. Now it’s up to the State Senate. Last week, all 14 Senate Democrats fled the state to prevent a vote; that, along with Ohio and Indiana, will be the next frontier for the issue.
  • Gay marriage had a big win this week when President Obama deemed the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional. He has instructed the Department of Justice to stop fighting challenges to the law in court.
  • Charlie Sheen’s latest public meltdown may be a turning point in his ongoing downward spiral. After Sheen called into a radio show and ranted against the producer of his show, Two and a Half Men, (calling him a “clown” and “little maggot”) CBS decided they had no choice but to pull the plug, at least temporarily. But who knows if that will stop Sheen. He told ABC’s Good Morning America that he’ll continue showing up for work, and is also saying that he’s 100 percent clean. Sheen’s fans may need not worry about screen time with the actor; Radar Online is reporting that he’s in talks with HBO to star in his own show, Sheen’s Corner.
3:50 PM, February 18th, 2011
What was on our radar this week? Continued protests in the Middle East and North Egypt, a disturbing spotlight on the dangers foreign reporting, a happy (plastic) reunion, and fashion’s darker side.
Egypt’s revolution continued its domino effect around the Arab world this week, with protests culminating in Bahrain, Libya, and Yemen. Police and security forces in each country exercised their own brutal crackdowns, and Bahrain seemed headed for the boiling point Friday, its fourth day of anti-government demonstrations. Bahrain’s conflict is less between pro- and anti-democracy forces than it is between the ruling Sunni class and Shiite majority.
Ugly news emerged in the week following Egypt’s exhilarating revolution that toppled the Mubarak regime. CBS correspondent Lara Logan suffered a brutal sexual assault while reporting for 60 minutes from Cairo’s Tahrir Square the day Mubarak stepped down. Things got uglier still when the media’s reaction to the event erupted into its own type of war. One casualty was Nir Rosen, a journalist and fellow at New York University who was forced to resign after joking insensitively about Logan’s attack.
The week got off to a sweet start with news that, just in time for Valentine’s Day, Ken and Barbie were reuniting. Didn’t realize they had broken up? Indeed, over the course of their 50-year romance, the iconic couple has been through their fair share of ups and downs, and parted ways in 2004. But Ken finally won Barbie back this V-day after taking out billboards declaring “Barbie, I want you back!” and proclaiming his love on the Times Square JumboTron.
Models and haute couture descended on New York City for Fashion Week, but fashion isn’t always pretty. At former Spice Girl Victoria Beckham’s show for her fall ready-to-wear collection, the notoriously brand-conscious members of the industry sneered and eye-rolled. Robin Givhan calls it fashion’s mean-girls syndrome, where earnestness doesn’t get one very far.

What was on our radar this week? Continued protests in the Middle East and North Egypt, a disturbing spotlight on the dangers foreign reporting, a happy (plastic) reunion, and fashion’s darker side.

  • Egypt’s revolution continued its domino effect around the Arab world this week, with protests culminating in Bahrain, Libya, and Yemen. Police and security forces in each country exercised their own brutal crackdowns, and Bahrain seemed headed for the boiling point Friday, its fourth day of anti-government demonstrations. Bahrain’s conflict is less between pro- and anti-democracy forces than it is between the ruling Sunni class and Shiite majority.
  • Ugly news emerged in the week following Egypt’s exhilarating revolution that toppled the Mubarak regime. CBS correspondent Lara Logan suffered a brutal sexual assault while reporting for 60 minutes from Cairo’s Tahrir Square the day Mubarak stepped down. Things got uglier still when the media’s reaction to the event erupted into its own type of war. One casualty was Nir Rosen, a journalist and fellow at New York University who was forced to resign after joking insensitively about Logan’s attack.
  • The week got off to a sweet start with news that, just in time for Valentine’s Day, Ken and Barbie were reuniting. Didn’t realize they had broken up? Indeed, over the course of their 50-year romance, the iconic couple has been through their fair share of ups and downs, and parted ways in 2004. But Ken finally won Barbie back this V-day after taking out billboards declaring “Barbie, I want you back!” and proclaiming his love on the Times Square JumboTron.
  • Models and haute couture descended on New York City for Fashion Week, but fashion isn’t always pretty. At former Spice Girl Victoria Beckham’s show for her fall ready-to-wear collection, the notoriously brand-conscious members of the industry sneered and eye-rolled. Robin Givhan calls it fashion’s mean-girls syndrome, where earnestness doesn’t get one very far.
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