DAILY BEAST TUMBLRS

2:18 PM, July 5th, 2012
discoverynews:

that back seat is pretty crazy!
gotagirlcrush:

Got a Girl Crush On: Emily Finch, mother of 6 with no car and 1 incredible bike
Call her crazy. Call her a Portland stereotype—although she claims she doesn’t do it to save the world—“I cancel out my bike riding every day with all the other terrible things I do,” she admits. “I don’t compost, I stink at vegetable gardening”.
But, Emily (34) traded in her SUV for a bakfiets (a traditional Dutch cargo tricycle) to haul her brood of six (ages 2 to 11).

In three years, Emily estimates she’s spent about $135 dollars maintaining her bike.
It also saves her money on exercise equipment or a gym membership. She’s lost 25 pounds since she got the bike in 2009 and says she never thought she’d get back to her pre-birth weight after having six kids. When I asked her why she doesn’t get an electric-assist system, she replied with a big smile, “Because I like chocolate!”


Talk about a POWER-FREAKIN-HOUSE!


Moms are incredible! 

discoverynews:

that back seat is pretty crazy!

gotagirlcrush:

Got a Girl Crush On: Emily Finch, mother of 6 with no car and 1 incredible bike

Call her crazy. Call her a Portland stereotype—although she claims she doesn’t do it to save the world—“I cancel out my bike riding every day with all the other terrible things I do,” she admits. “I don’t compost, I stink at vegetable gardening”.

But, Emily (34) traded in her SUV for a bakfiets (a traditional Dutch cargo tricycle) to haul her brood of six (ages 2 to 11).

In three years, Emily estimates she’s spent about $135 dollars maintaining her bike.

It also saves her money on exercise equipment or a gym membership. She’s lost 25 pounds since she got the bike in 2009 and says she never thought she’d get back to her pre-birth weight after having six kids. When I asked her why she doesn’t get an electric-assist system, she replied with a big smile, “Because I like chocolate!”

Talk about a POWER-FREAKIN-HOUSE!

Moms are incredible! 

Reblogged from DiscoveryNews
2:03 PM, June 14th, 2012
I think that's a dumb law suit. The majority of the population uses cars and produces emissions in many ways. I don't know how the US government is responsible for emissions. The population of the world shares the responsibility!

Point taken. But the U.S. government does control things like EPA and emissions regulation, which could help cut “emissions of carbon dioxide by at least six percent per year beginning in 2013.”

12:51 PM, June 14th, 2012

An Inconvenient Lawsuit: Teenagers Take Global Warming to the Courts

Alec Loorz turns 18 at the end of this month. While finishing high school and playing Ultimate Frisbee on weekends, he’s also suing the federal government in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C.

The Ventura, California, teen and four other juvenile plaintiffs want government officials to do more to prevent the risks of climate change — the dangerous storms, heat waves, rising sea levels, and food-supply disruptions that scientists warn will threaten their generation absent a major turnabout in global energy policy. Specifically, the students are demanding that the U.S. government start reducing national emissions of carbon dioxide by at least six percent per year beginning in 2013.

“I think a lot of young people realize that this is an urgent time, and that we’re not going to solve this problem just by riding our bikes more,” Loorz said in an interview.

Read more. [Image: Victoria Loorz]

Young people doing things! 

Reblogged from Utne Reader
10:17 AM, June 14th, 2011

(Left): London, which for centuries was renowned for its smog and severe pollution. Today the city has the cleanest air that it has had since the Middle Ages. (Right): Shanghai, one of the most polluted cities in the developing world.

But here’s why climate alarmists shouldn’t fret so much: We’re actually much better at sustainability and innovation than we think. In virtually every developed country, the air is more breathable and the water is more drinkable than they were 40 years ago. And "exaggerated environmental worries—and the willingness of so many to believe them—could ultimately prevent us from finding smarter ways to actually help our planet and ensure the health of the environment for future generations," writes Bjorn Lomborg in this week’s Newsweek International edition.

Photos: Johannes Mann / Corbis (left); Michael Prince / Gallery Stock

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