DAILY BEAST TUMBLRS

4:43 PM, June 7th, 2013
We had not heard of a program called PRISM until yesterday.
Apparently Google didn’t know about PRISM, writes CEO Larry Page in a post titled “What the…?” 
3:36 PM, March 7th, 2013

stevekovach:

Google at its best. 

More on BuzzFeed.

Whooaaa! 

Reblogged from I Love Charts
4:06 PM, May 29th, 2012
We used to say that Google was making us stupid. But now the process is complete: Google knows we’re stupid. Quite how stupid, though, you might not realize.
8:56 AM, February 1st, 2012
medilldc:

Google Politics & Elections gives a breakdown of the questions asked during last night’s Google+ hangout with President Barack Obama.
Obama “sat down” with five voters during the virtual interview, also fielding questions other participants could submit via Google or YouTube. More than 133,000 were submitted, according to the White House. 
About 35 percent of questions regarded jobs and the economy, with government reform and foreign policy making up 24 and 20 percent of questions, respectively.
By David Uberti 

medilldc:

Google Politics & Elections gives a breakdown of the questions asked during last night’s Google+ hangout with President Barack Obama.

Obama “sat down” with five voters during the virtual interview, also fielding questions other participants could submit via Google or YouTube. More than 133,000 were submitted, according to the White House. 

About 35 percent of questions regarded jobs and the economy, with government reform and foreign policy making up 24 and 20 percent of questions, respectively.

By David Uberti 

Reblogged from National Journal
8:11 PM, January 24th, 2012
Reblogged from The Longest Week
9:05 AM, January 18th, 2012
Reblogged from The Longest Week
10:03 AM, October 6th, 2011

shortformblog:

Note the bottom of this image.

Touching and classy.

Reblogged from ShortFormBlog
5:41 PM, August 16th, 2011
12:47 PM, August 15th, 2011

Google Purchases Motorola Mobility for $12.5 Billion

Last month Apple and Microsoft teamed up to buy a batch of mobile-phone patents from Nortel for $4.5 billion. Google competed in the auction, but made crazy bids—and then abruptly pulled out at the end. Its official explanation was that the price was too high. But now it seems possible that Google never wanted the Nortel patents to begin with—and just hoped to drive up the price and force its rivals to overpay.

11:57 AM, June 30th, 2011
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