DAILY BEAST TUMBLRS

12:13 PM, May 17th, 2012

nwkarchivist:

Donna Summer, 1948-2012

Easing her full-throttle delivery down to a shivery whisper, she moaned over and over into the microphone, “Ooooh, aaah, love to love you, bay-bee…”  Summer would later boast of simulating 22 orgasms, but whatever she did, it worked…

Newsweek April 2, 1979

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
1:41 PM, May 15th, 2012

nwkarchivist:

TV vs. Print Advertising- The War Was On

Newsweek, 1969

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
10:58 AM, May 11th, 2012

nwkarchivist:

May 11, 1996- “Into Thin Air”

On a sunny afternoon just over a week ago, climbers at the Everest base camp at 17,700 feet saw the sky over the summit turn an ominous deep purple, while the handful on top felt the wind pick up with the suddenness of an opened window. Clouds boiled up from the slopes below, where the nearest shelter, a cluster of Mad-whipped tents, was a 10-hour walk away in a little saddle called the South Col. Over the next 36 hours, five people would die between the summit and South Col, and three others, approaching the peak from a different direction, would disappear in the same storm. Others would survive with hands so frozen they clinked like glasses, dead black flesh peeling from their faces. And all so they could stand on that little patch of rock, where you can almost feel the wind of the planet’s rotation in your face, the place on Earth that’s closest to the stars.

Newsweek May 27, 1996

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
6:32 PM, May 10th, 2012

Something cool to check out

petervidani:

Lots of people tag their posts with a year:

Reply with some good ones!

Cool!

Reblogged from Joshua Nguyen
10:27 AM, May 8th, 2012

nwkarchivist:

Victory in Europe Complete;

Allies Now Turn Efforts Toward Smashing Jap War Machine

A peace that passeth all understanding came to the world this week.  It was anticlimactic, it was premature, it was confusing, it was the greatest snafu of all time-but it was wonderful.  On the 2,075th day of the biggest, costliest war in history, some 25,000,000 ceased fighting.  Ahead lay the difficult problems of the peace and the hard struggle to bring to an end the other half of the global war, the war against Japan.  But for a few days at least a great burden was lifted for muvh of mankind.

Newsweek May 14, 1945

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
5:46 PM, May 4th, 2012

nwkarchivist:

May 4, 1970:  ’My God!  They’re Killing Us’

The sudden volley of rifle fire from National Guard troops that killed four Kent State students and wounded ten others last week echoed even more loudly than it might have at one of the capitals of campus protest such as Berkeley or Columbia.  The bloody incident shocked and further divided a nation already riven by dissent over the war in Indochina.  More than that, the shots fired at Kent State were taken by some as a warning that the U.S. might be edging toward the brink of warfare of sorts on the home front.

Newsweek May 18, 1970

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
12:56 PM, May 3rd, 2012

nwkarchivist:

YOUR FACSIMILE NEWSPAPER OF TOMORROW!

Ready for you when you wake up, your newspaper of the future will be facsimile-printed through the night-in tabloid size, on a continuous roll.  You will bring yourself up-to-the-minute on the highlights of the news…by seeing what is happening on the television screen of the same machine.  Fantastic?  It’s already planned for post-war home use!

Newsweek November 6, 1944

Not sure how this is a whiskey ad? 

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
12:40 PM, May 2nd, 2012

So President Obama is launching his reelection campaign and happens to mention one of the greatest foreign-policy achievements of our time: the killing of Osama bin Laden.

And Republicans go bananas.

C’mon people, it would have been absurd not to mention it.

12:42 PM, April 19th, 2012

nwkarchivist:

This Was A Very Bad Day In 1995

ONE MINUTE, THEY WERE going about the usual business of bureaucracy. The next, their lives were blown apart. Capt. Bandy Norfleet, USMC, had gone to the Marine Recruiting Command Center on the fifth floor of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building to talk about funding his station in Stillwater. Dana Bradley had gone to get a social-security card for her 4-month-old son. Across the street at the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, administrative assistant Irish Hall said the blast was instantaneous — a flash of blue lights and then her head was bleeding. For Henderson Baker II, it seemed like cons. The 34-year-old army captain had been chatting with his NCO in the fourth-floor office of the Army Recruiting Command. Suddenly, the floor blew out from under him and he was hurtling down. A hundred things flashed through his mind: “I thought about my wife and my son. I thought, ‘Was this an earthquake? Am I dying? Am I dreaming?’” Then he hit the ground and blacked out.

Newsweek May 1, 1995

Read our article on a new book that answers a lot of the lingering questions about the bombing

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
12:55 PM, April 16th, 2012

nwkarchivist:

Bob Dylan Introduced “Blowin’ In The Wind” 50 Years Ago Today…

But Did He Write It?

Newsweek November 4, 1963

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
3:04 PM, April 9th, 2012
capitalnewyork:

braiker:

Inside the newsroom: How the New York Times and the New York Evening World covered the sinking of the Titanic. Pictured above, Sun editor Charles E. Chapin (before he’d be arrested for the murder of his wife) in the newsroom. And I thought my desk was messy.

‘Staches.

Interns (far left). 

capitalnewyork:

braiker:

Inside the newsroom: How the New York Times and the New York Evening World covered the sinking of the Titanic. Pictured above, Sun editor Charles E. Chapin (before he’d be arrested for the murder of his wife) in the newsroom. And I thought my desk was messy.

‘Staches.

Interns (far left). 

Reblogged from Capital New York
4:32 PM, March 21st, 2012
Emma Goldman yelled to her crowd of dupes in Union Square Saturday afternoon, “March down to the Mayor, march down to the police!” Her instructions ought not to have been needed. New York pays heavily for protection from mob violence. The authority of the city should have been vigorously represented there, where Emma Goldman, a professional law-breaker to whom we grant unaccountable license, was inciting an ignorant assemblage to violence. The parade on Fifth Avenue was a clear violation of the letter and the spirit of our laws. Parades without permits are illegal. A mob of some hundreds blocked traffic and insulted decent and peaceable citizens for an hour or more.
So begins a New York Times story from 1914. (via @AllisonBurtch, h/t @Newyorkist)
12:05 PM, March 21st, 2012

nwkarchivist:

On This Date In 1965, 3,000+ Demonstrators Began Their March From Selma To Montgomery, Alabama.

They started down U.S. 80 out of Selma on a Sunday clear as crystal, and they marched into Montgomery four days later in a light spring rain.  They arrived a nomad army, their feet blistered, their clothes mud-splattered, their faces sun-scorched, their ragtag column led by two flag-bearers and a one-legged man on crutches and a piper playing “Yankee Doodle” on a reedy fife.

Newsweek April 5, 1965

Reblogged from Newsweek Archivist
4:57 PM, March 19th, 2012

Since 1976, no serious contender, Democrat or Republican, has watched his favorable ratings fall as low as Romney’s have in recent months. Or watched his unfavorable ratings climb as high. Or watched his overall numbers stay underwater—that is, more unfavorable than favorable—for so long.

At this rate, Romney is shaping up to be the most unpopular presidential nominee on record.

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