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12:24 PM, March 14th, 2012

Frontpage: Wednesday, Mar 14th

  1. Twin Earthquakes Hit JapanTwo earthquakes rattled Japan on Wednesday, just days after the anniversary of 2011’s tragic tsunami. No damages or injuries have been reported from either incident. 
  2. Newt Vows to ContinueNewt Gingrich is sticking in the race, despite a disappointing second-place finish in Alabama and Mississippi. The GOP campaign is essentially a two-man race between Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum, with Gingrich representing a potential drag on Santorum. But the former speaker doesn’t see it that way. 
  3. Santorum: ‘We Did It Again’: Rick Santorum was met with huge cheers from his supporters as he exclaimed at the opening of his victory speech in Alabama, “We did it again,” foreshadowing his subsequent win in Mississippi.
  4. Panetta Visits Afghanistan: Defense Secretary Leon Panetta arrived in Afghanistan, pledging that the U.S. would not change its strategy, despite recent tensions. In a possible acknowledgment of tensions after a U.S. soldier allegedly massacred 16 Afghan civilians, Marines were asked to leave their weapons outside the tent before Panetta spoke.
  5. Goldman Exec Quits in NYT Op-Ed: Goldman Sachs executive Greg Smith knows how to go out with a bang. “Today is my last day at Goldman Sachs,” he writes in a New York Times op-ed. He’s been at Goldman for 12 years, and says, “The environment now is as toxic and destructive as I have ever seen it.”

Read More Cheats

Photo: Indian and U.S. army soldiers performed drills during a two-week joint military exercise in Bikaner, Rajasthan, India. (Dinesh Gupta / AP Photo)

1:01 PM, April 5th, 2011

Unbelievable aerial footage of the Tsunami in Japan, shot from a helicopter. Click through to see it full screen.

(via)

10:36 AM, April 4th, 2011
When I heard that the operation was to spray water to the reactors, I felt that we were the right people to do it. We are good at spraying water.
 Ken’ichi Kunisawa, a Japanese firefighter who spent 13 hours fighting the nuclear reactors.
10:28 AM, March 24th, 2011

This stretch of the Great Kanto highway was wrecked by deep chasms in the March 11 earthquake - but was repaired in just six days

Amazing.

4:00 PM, March 23rd, 2011
thedailywhat:

Photo Series of the Day: The first photos of the so-called Fukushima Fifty — the fifty heroic nuclear reactor employees working around the clock to prevent a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant — have finally emerged.
An additional 150 workers have since joined the original fifty, of which five are believed to have died. Many of those inside the plant readily admit that, while they are still alive, they know radiation poisoning will eventually kill them.
[dailymail.]

Jesus.

thedailywhat:

Photo Series of the Day: The first photos of the so-called Fukushima Fifty — the fifty heroic nuclear reactor employees working around the clock to prevent a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant — have finally emerged.

An additional 150 workers have since joined the original fifty, of which five are believed to have died. Many of those inside the plant readily admit that, while they are still alive, they know radiation poisoning will eventually kill them.

[dailymail.]

Jesus.

11:10 AM, March 22nd, 2011
2:56 PM, March 18th, 2011
11:45 AM, March 18th, 2011

Sukee: Diaries From Japan

We recently asked people in Japan to send us short dispatches of their everyday lives after the quake, tsunami, and resulting nuclear disaster. Here’s one we just got in from “Sukee.”

We are trying to carry on with our lives and our jobs. Despite the earthquake, the tsunami, and the nuclear disaster, we are attempting to [maintain] control. Even, when the images of the tsunami destroying whole towns are frightening and many of us are traumatized. Of course, the Japanese people are scared of the nuclear plants heating up and exploding. However, the rest us who are not immediately affected should keep the country going in our own small ways.  Stay calm, Japan! We’ll pull through! Look at all the brave people risking their lives to stop a greater disaster. We should be backing them up.

Have your own Japan Diary? Send it to newsweektsunami@gmail.com.

9:37 AM, March 17th, 2011
Hibakusha, the Japanese word for “radiation-exposed people,” generally refers to people in Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the atomic bombs were dropped, but the term can be used for anyone exposed to radiation. Field explained that parents exposed to radiation didn’t want their children to be known as hibakusha because they feared it would hurt their marriage prospects. In Japan, there is more scrutiny of a potential partner by prospective in-laws, and the stain of hibakusha can even be passed down to the second and third generation.
3:20 PM, March 16th, 2011
A model, via NHK, that shows the four damaged reactors at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

A model, via NHK, that shows the four damaged reactors at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

11:58 AM, March 16th, 2011
itsending:

Fukushima infographic, courtesy of Reuters, to visualize what has happened up to 2011-03-15.

Why stories are sometimes not enough.

itsending:

Fukushima infographic, courtesy of Reuters, to visualize what has happened up to 2011-03-15.

Why stories are sometimes not enough.

Reblogged from The Atlantic
10:00 AM, March 16th, 2011

MOX

MOX, a controversial and rarely used fuelwas recently being used at reactor No. 3 at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi plant, and has so far been just a “footnote in the unfolding drama in Japan.” But as the nuclear situation in Japan worsens, scientists are becoming concerned. Some argue it could be radically more toxic to human health if released into the atmosphere. “It could change the nature of what could happen if it’s released,” said Paul Carroll, who has worked on nuclear weapons production and waste management issues for nearly 20 years in Congress and the Energy Department. “The bottom line is that if you have an uncontrolled accident and release, then MOX fuel will raise your health and safety risks.”

10:37 AM, March 15th, 2011
8:06 AM, March 15th, 2011

Props to the editors for throwing their well-laid plans out the window to cover the earthquake in Japan. In this week’s Newsweek, Simon Winchester tells us why the tsunami that struck Japan should have Californians worried, Andrew Romano and Pat Wingert report on the number of Americans killed by guns since the shooting of Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (hint: it hasn’t let up), and Tony Dokoupil and Ramin Setoodeh on Celine Dion’s return to Sin City after its economic collapse.

This Newsweek cover has been brought to you by Sir Charles the Cat. Also known as Chawlie, Chuck, Charles, sweetface—or just Charlie.

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