DAILY BEAST TUMBLRS

3:37 PM, July 25th, 2012
sunfoundation:

Putting Romney’s tax returns in presidential context

The controversy over what’s hiding in Mitt Romney’s unreleased tax returns continues.  But even without the missing filings, putting his 2010 and 2011 tax numbers in context is strikingly informative. It dramatically shows what an outlier Romney is on a few basic tax and income dimensions.


One of these (OK, two) is not like the others…

sunfoundation:

Putting Romney’s tax returns in presidential context

The controversy over what’s hiding in Mitt Romney’s unreleased tax returns continues.  But even without the missing filings, putting his 2010 and 2011 tax numbers in context is strikingly informative. It dramatically shows what an outlier Romney is on a few basic tax and income dimensions.

One of these (OK, two) is not like the others…

Reblogged from Nick Turse
4:00 PM, July 13th, 2012

A follow-up to a post from this morning on the wealth of presidents (if you’re viewing this in the dashboard, just hit play to see the infographic):

Based on John Avalon’s commentary today on the riches of American presidential candidates, we delve in a bit further to find out just how entrenched into 1% candidates over the past few decades have been. For this chart, we look at every presidential election for which we could find income data for both major party candidates—that’s 1972 through 2012, and 1952. The pie charts encompass the earnings for candidates for those years, pegged to 2012 dollars. The bar chart and supplementary text box are based on real dollars—that is, not inflation adjusted. Note that this is earnings data for the year before the November election, and does not reflect each candidate’s net worth.

National income estimates are based on research by Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez. For full methodology and data sources, see our gallery.

-Clark Merrefield

6:38 PM, June 12th, 2012
theweekmagazine:

BANKRUPT USAA numerical look at the average family’s financial struggles:
$126,400 Net worth of the median American family in 2007
$77,300 Net worth of the median family in 2010
40 Percentage drop in wealth over that three-year period
15.2 Median percentage of debt that was education-related in 2007
19.2 Median percentage of education-related debt in 2010
7 Percentage of Americans late on their debt payments in 2007
11 Percentage late on payments in 2010
The dwindling wealth of the American family: By the numbers

theweekmagazine:

BANKRUPT USA
A numerical look at the average family’s financial struggles:

$126,400 
Net worth of the median American family in 2007

$77,300 
Net worth of the median family in 2010

40 
Percentage drop in wealth over that three-year period

15.2 
Median percentage of debt that was education-related in 2007

19.2 
Median percentage of education-related debt in 2010

7 
Percentage of Americans late on their debt payments in 2007

11 
Percentage late on payments in 2010

The dwindling wealth of the American family: By the numbers

(Source: theweek.com)

Reblogged from NPR
11:04 AM, May 31st, 2012

shortformblog:

futurejournalismproject:

@boonepickens just stunted on me heavy.

Via Gizmodo:

There has never before been a point in history when a young black guy rich off of Canadian soap operas and luxury super-rap could exchange words with a quasi-eccentric super-rich octogenarian who loves wind power. Now they can—in public. And that, simply, is awesome.

Twitter: where world’s collide, and that’s a good thing.

This somehow feels related to our last post. This would never happen on Facebook.

C.R.E.A.M. 

Reblogged from ShortFormBlog
3:19 PM, May 9th, 2012
Reblogged from that andy cohen
7:23 PM, April 6th, 2012
The conflict is rooted in a belief that Apple customers have higher income and better taste, and that Android users are hoi polloi who are so vulgar or stupid that they can’t see why Apple products are better.
11:55 AM, January 25th, 2012

thedailyfeed:

Mitt Romney earned $21.6 million in 2010 — and paid just 14% in taxes, far less than Newt Gingrich’s 31.7% or Obama’s 26.3%.

In fact, the Romneys paid a higher tax rate to foreign countries, handing over 18 percent on the almost $375,000 that they garnered abroad. The former Massachusetts governor also shelled out almost $3 million to charity, roughly 16 percent of his post-tax haul.

Reblogged from The Daily
10:21 AM, October 31st, 2011

newsweek:

Why do you think we’re hard-wired to spend money? In this week’s issue, we ask science for an explanation.

Reblogged from Newsweek
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