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1:01 PM, November 28th, 2012

picturedept:

A Tale of Two Holidays in Sandy’s Aftermath

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas, except in places ravaged by superstorm Sandy. While most people have recovered from the hurricane’s devastating winds and storm surge, pockets of New York and New Jersey are still reeling from the damage. Thousands have been displaced from their homes and lost everything with the storm. Yet, the extravagant holiday decorating continues apace in New York City. The Daily Beast looks at the disparity between the haves and have nots this holiday season.

Above, clockwise from top left:

Kathy Kmonicek / AP: A woman looks at a pair of jeans amongst the pile of clothing in front of Long Beach city hall donated for victims of Superstorm Sandy, November 6, 2012.

Peter Foley, Bloomberg / Getty Images: Women browse handbags at a Macy’s Inc. store in New York on Black Friday, November 23, 2012.

Mark Lennihan / AP Photo: Christmas decorations, salvaged from the charred remains of a home, are shown in Breezy Point, Queens, November 13, 2012.

Don Emmert / Getty Images: Christmas decorations are displayed at a Walmart store in Norwalk, Connecticut, November 17, 2012 .

Some powerful contrasts here.

Reblogged from Picture Dept
4:53 PM, October 16th, 2012

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC:  “Five Doors II”, painted in 1967 by Gerhard Richter, sold at auction on Oct. 11 for a paltry $3.5 million, while a Richter abstraction from 1994 sold the next day for $34.2 million, setting a record for any living artist.   I wrote about the Richter record on today’s Daily Beast, and argued that the abstraction fetched its price because it was so much less challenging that Richter’s earlier figuration, while still bearing his august name. (Although I’ve since found out it’s a kind of fake record: A Lucien Freud sold for more while he was alive, but because he has since died, that sale is being ignored. That is, the auction houses are defining the record as being for an artist alive now rather than for an artist alive at the time of the sale of his or her work.) What I left out of my Beast piece was any discussion of “Five Doors” as a work of art. Several expert sources, speaking like old-fashioned connoisseurs, dismissed it as weaker than Richter’s landmark photo-based paintings of the 1960s. I guess I can’t go to bat for “Five Doors” as a masterpiece, but I do think that its very oddness will some day have museums eager to have it, as an example of the range of Richter’s early experimentation. The late, sort-of-record-breaking abstraction is too much like other Richters of its moment to be especially preferred over them. (Image courtesy Christie’s Images Ltd., 2012)

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic, along with more global art news, can also be found on the Art Beast page at thedailybeast.com.

The above went for $3.5m. This one went for $34.2m. Which do you like better?

Reblogged from BLAKE GOPNIK on art
12:39 PM, February 17th, 2012
motherjones:

rtnt:

How Target Knows You’re Pregnant
Writing for The New York Times, Charles Duhigg examines how retailers collect your data and, using the science of habit formation, analyze it to make a profit:

About a year after Pole created his pregnancy-prediction model, a man walked into a Target outside Minneapolis and demanded to see the manager. He was clutching coupons that had been sent to his daughter, and he was angry, according to an employee who participated in the conversation.
“My daughter got this in the mail!” he said. “She’s still in high school, and you’re sending her coupons for baby clothes and cribs? Are you trying to encourage her to get pregnant?”
The manager didn’t have any idea what the man was talking about. He looked at the mailer. Sure enough, it was addressed to the man’s daughter and contained advertisements for maternity clothing, nursery furniture and pictures of smiling infants. The manager apologized and then called a few days later to apologize again.
On the phone, though, the father was somewhat abashed. “I had a talk with my daughter,” he said. “It turns out there’s been some activities in my house I haven’t been completely aware of. She’s due in August. I owe you an apology.”

 Read the full article here. 

Whoa. Whoa. WHOA.

Whoa! 

motherjones:

rtnt:

How Target Knows You’re Pregnant

Writing for The New York Times, Charles Duhigg examines how retailers collect your data and, using the science of habit formation, analyze it to make a profit:

About a year after Pole created his pregnancy-prediction model, a man walked into a Target outside Minneapolis and demanded to see the manager. He was clutching coupons that had been sent to his daughter, and he was angry, according to an employee who participated in the conversation.

“My daughter got this in the mail!” he said. “She’s still in high school, and you’re sending her coupons for baby clothes and cribs? Are you trying to encourage her to get pregnant?”

The manager didn’t have any idea what the man was talking about. He looked at the mailer. Sure enough, it was addressed to the man’s daughter and contained advertisements for maternity clothing, nursery furniture and pictures of smiling infants. The manager apologized and then called a few days later to apologize again.

On the phone, though, the father was somewhat abashed. “I had a talk with my daughter,” he said. “It turns out there’s been some activities in my house I haven’t been completely aware of. She’s due in August. I owe you an apology.”

Read the full article here.

Whoa. Whoa. WHOA.

Whoa! 

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